Teaching Experiences

During my time in graduate school, I have been given a variety of opportunities to develop my pedagogical skills inside and outside the classroom. Below details the various roles that I have served in during my time at Georgia State University including as a Graduate Teaching Assistant (GTA), an Instructor of Record, and a Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) Consultant.

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Graduate Teaching Assistant:

  • American Constitutional Law (POLS 4130) – Dr. Micheal P. Fix – Department of Political Science, Georgia State University, Fall 2016.
    • As a teaching assistant, I assisted the professor of record in grading and other course management. I provided students feedback on writing assignments and exams for the course. Additionally, I prepared lecture and other course materials for future opportunities to act as instructor of record. During the development of this course, I also learned to create course materials in LaTex in order to further develop my software skills.
  • Senior Seminar: Social Justice and Politics (POLS 4900) – Dr. Toby Bolsen – Department of Political Science, Georgia State University, Spring 2016.
    • My term as teaching assistant for this course coincided with my time as the Graduate Research Assistant for the Zoukis Research Collaborative within the department of Political Science. As a senior seminar, this course was designed to be research intensive. During the semester, Dr. Bolsen and I worked with students to design a survey experiment, generate hypotheses, and collect original data on the use of solitary confinement to later be analyzed at the Zoukis Summer Institute.

Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) Consultant:

  • American Constitutional Law (POLS 4130) – Dr. Micheal P. Fix – Department of Political Science, Georgia State University, Fall 2017.
    • As a WAC consultant with the Center for Teaching and Learning (CETL) at Georgipeople-coffee-notes-tea.jpga State University, my role was to provide guidance and critical feedback to student writing in a Pre-Law course. The course required students to create hypothetical case briefs to a given set of facts based on the course material for an American Constitutional Law class. Students were encourages to meet with me one on one to discuss the critical feedback that I provided to their assignment drafts. My mentoring allowed them to better develop their writing and critical thinking skills when evaluating law and precedent in America.
    • The course was also cross-listed with an Honors section of the course.  In addition to the case response assignment, Honors students were required to write an additional research paper on the development of some subset of law (of their choosing) in the modern era. Students were encouraged to meet with me to help develop their research and writing throughout the assignment process.

Instructor of Record:

  • Introduction to American Government (POLS 1101) – Department of Political Science, Georgia State University, Fall 2017-Spring 2018.
    • Class Size: 175 Students per semester
    • To overcome the pedagogical challenges that come with teaching super sections of students such as these, I choose to utilize an online text, Central Ideas in American Government, and the Soomo Learning webtext platform of activities.
  • Zoukis Summer Institute & Research Collaborative (POLS 4190) – Group Instructor, Department of Political Science, Georgia State University, Summer 2017.
    • Group Size: 7-10 students per group
    • As a group instructor for the Zoukis Research Collaborative, I worked alongside fellow graduate student instructors to teach undergraduate students about applied policy research in areas of criminal and social justice reform. Specifically we worked with students to develop hypothesis, evaluate and specify regression models, review relevant literature, and create and interpret results from survey data on attitudes towards solitary confinement and the use of mandatory minimums.
  • American Constitutional Law (POLS 4130) – Department of Political Science, Georgia State University, Summer 2017.
    • Class Size: 45 students
    • This course provides a broad overview of the development of constitutional law in areas related to the powers and constraints placed on each branch of government by the Constitution. As such, it is a prerequisite course for all students enrolled in the pre-Law political science major. My course was designed to prepare Junior and Senior undergraduates for the law school environment. I utilized a Socratic method teaching style to review Supreme Court cases rather than relying on lecture. Additionally, this course was writing intensive requiring students to prepare formal case briefs for each section of substantive lecture.
  • Civil Liberties and Rights (POLS 4131) – Department of Political Science, Georgia State University, Summer 2017.
    • Class Size: 25 students
    • This course provides a broad overview of the development of constitutional law in areas related to civil liberties, criminal rights, and civil rights. As such, it is a prerequisite course for all students enrolled in the pre-Law political science major. My course was designed to prepare Junior and Senior undergraduates for the law school environment. I utilized a Socratic method teaching style to review Supreme Court cases rather than relying on lecture. Additionally, this course was writing intensive requiring students to prepare formal case briefs for each section of substantive lecture.
  • Zoukis Summer Institute & Research Collaborative (POLS 4190) – Group Instructor, Department of Political Science, Georgia State University, Summer 2016.
    • Group Size: 7-10 students
  • Introduction to American Government (POLS 1101) – Department of Political Science, Georgia State University, Summer 2015.
    • Class Size: 25 students per session
    • Students enrolled in these sections were part of a Georgia State First Year initiative called Success Academy. Success Academy students are part of an extended learning opportunity to come to campus and take classes prior to the Fall semester. Students are placed into small structured class environments that provide support and guidance for newly admitted college students.
    • This class style provided me the opportunity to bring new tactics for student engagement into my class material. Classes were structured around daily group activities, digital engagement, and other adaptive learning techniques that maybe found otherwise challenging to complete in large lecture settings.
  • Introduction to American Government (POLS 1101) – Department of Political Science, Georgia State University, Fall 2014-Spring 2015.
    • Class Size: 80 students (Fall) and 120 students (Spring)
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